JIM JOHNSON I'M CALLING YOU OUT



  • @hootin I’m with the international church of Christ and they take following the word of God pretty seriously



  • @iattacku I thought all French people were Roman Catholic



  • @bem said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    @iattacku I thought all French people were Roman Catholic

    Or Muslim.

    @hootin said

    Also baptist was the other denomination I was looking at, they and the mormons seem to be the ones fighting the most against today’s slipping of morals, though I’m aware theyre also slipping.

    I think you will find there are as many types of baptists as there are breeds of chickens. :D

    Every group is slipping. Integrity is an individual trait and must be upheld by the individual. Groups serve mainly to connect those individuals.

    I’m primarily interested in joining a religious sect for the social cohesion. I want to have friends and eventually find a wife who have a similar moral compass to mine, and it just so happens that I live a very ‘Christian’ lifestyle.

    Though you’re right that I can’t just force myself into believing. I was just hoping there was some way I could stumble into it, as the last thing I would want to do is live a lie and marry a moral religious woman while lying about my own faith.

    You are a very interesting person and I don’t really know what to tell you.

    Have you spoken to any clergy about this? There are plenty of weird and disappointing ones so choose with care, but face-to-face may give you more guidance than strangers on the internet.



  • @ransom What prompted me to start this topic was that I was planning to visit a local LDS church that day, but they were closed. I should try again this coming sunday.

    I thank you for the replies, you certaintly didn’t have to deliberate so much with a stranger over the internet.



  • @hootin It’s a pleasure.

    Have you ever read A Pilgrim’s Progress? It is an allegory of the Christian life that I have derived a lot of value from. It is written in YE OLDE FANCIE ENGLISHE but there should be modern “translations” as well if you like.

    Jim Johnson and I agree on a bushelful of things, but due to our different religious backgrounds we necessarily disagree on certain doctrinal stuff. The pursuit of truth is a difficult thing with many disagreements. As with many controversies, what seems obvious may change with new information. Beware of being comfortable.

    Oh, and as a rule of thumb any group that cuts people off from everyone outside the group is probably wacko, but you knew that.



  • @hootin you can try the local international church of Christ



  • @ransom true as a matter of fact there is a whole discussion that I started in the religion section on whether water baptism is needed for salvation



  • @ransom

    The pursuit of truth is a difficult thing with many disagreements.

    That, right there, is the Truth (John 8:32). My take on religion and more particularly Christianity is this: You can go to church, memorize verses and even “walk the walk”, but until you actually grasp the underlying message you will not gain wisdom nor find the truth.



  • @ransom

    I’ll definitely check it out, I’ve picked up reading again recently so I’ll add it to the list.



  • @iattacku This coming weekend I’m going church hunting. Gonna hit every denomination in my local area, see what stands out to me.



  • @boothe said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    @ransom

    The pursuit of truth is a difficult thing with many disagreements.

    That, right there, is the Truth (John 8:32). My take on religion and more particularly Christianity is this: You can go to church, memorize verses and even “walk the walk”, but until you actually grasp the underlying message you will not gain wisdom nor find the truth.

    I think that one of the primary sins of western civilization is the belief that every meaningful thing can be reduced to mechanics, followed closely by the exaltation of measurability.

    @hootin said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    @iattacku This coming weekend I’m going church hunting. Gonna hit every denomination in my local area, see what stands out to me.

    Please report back on what you found to be a) particularly interesting, and b) particularly goofy. Especially the outfits.



  • @hootin
    Catholic here. Very, very lapsed Catholic.
    Haven’t been to confession since I was 17.
    But…if I did get back to religion, I would stick to my roots.
    Would find a Priest I felt I could relate to and have a face to face confession with him. Would probably take 4 hours minimum! Why not stick with your religion? If you are serious, try volunteering with your local church/diocese. Do they have a meals on wheels program? Or a mentoring program? Part time teaching?
    Give it a shot. Believe it or not, even being the degenerate that I am. I have thought about doing these things. May even follow through with it one day. I don’t know, maybe teach computer programming courses or something. Try sticking with what you were raised in before looking elsewhere. You may be surprised at what you find.



  • @hootin
    Also, miss your posts on the articles.
    You have some great opinions and perspectives.
    Let’s hear what you have to say!



  • @Ransom Will do.

    @AutomaticSlim I’ll probably start with a local Catholic church then, since its how I was raised. I went to an all boys high school in Manhattan, where many of the teachers were priests and I had alot of respect for a couple of them. We had mandatory confession (had to go, not neccesarily participate) every quarter. During one of the last ones my senior year I went up for the first time, and approached one of the priests. I asked essentially:

    “I’m not actually religious but I would like some advice. What do I do once I graduate?”

    At the time I really had no direction, being a dumb teenager and all. He tells me essentially:

    “Go out and travel outside your comfort zone. You will not find out what you truly enjoy or dislike staying here where you’re not being challenged”.

    Four years later I’m now inadvertently taking his advice having moved halfway across the county where I know noone. I can say he was right, I’m going through some challenges but they’re satisfying to face and conquer. I recently got a job offer where the owner of the business wants to groom me for a manager position. I have no relevant experience, the guy says I basically just wowed him in the interview so he’s giving me a shot. I wouldnt’ have had the balls to even apply for a similar position back home. I think I’m just ranting nowso Ill cut it here.

    Thanks for the kind words! I didn’t think my posts would be missed. I’ve just been busy, working around 50 hours a week and now I’ll be moving to Milwaukee for this new job which is another ordeal. I’ll try to post when I can in my cracks of free time.



  • @ransom

    Its been awhile, so here’s an update since you asked.

    I read A Pilgrim’s Progress as suggested and found it enthralling, so much so that I also gave John Bunyan’s “The Holy War” a read as well. Reading these two novels provoked me to give the Bible another shot, but this time I read it with an actual motivation to understand what was written, rather then just read passages that I was forced to back in middle school and high school.

    After going through certain books multiple times (Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and The New Testament, in particular) something began to hit me. Every time I read the passages over there was some sort of level of deeper understanding that I seemed to gleam from them, and it hasn’t stopped yet. I keep reading the same things over and over but they weigh more in my heart every single time if that makes sense.

    I believe that I’ve had a change of heart experience as my motivations in life are now different. I now do believe that I’ve been saved purely due to the grace and mercy of Jesus Christ, and that its my responsibility to live life as its written in order to celebrate this salvation. I started attending a Reformed Baptist church about 3 weeks ago, and they’ve mostly affirmed my beliefs including that the Bible is the inspired word of God and the only source of authority, no man made dogma should be followed. The people I’ve met so far seem to be cut from a different cloth then what I’m used to, and I hope to emulate how kind and compassionate they are.

    I’d like to sincerely thank you for the book suggestion, since it spurred me to have this conversion. You’ve done more for a young man over the internet then you can ever imagine.



  • @hootin said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    @ransom

    Its been awhile, so here’s an update since you asked.

    I read A Pilgrim’s Progress as suggested and found it enthralling, so much so that I also gave John Bunyan’s “The Holy War” a read as well. Reading these two novels provoked me to give the Bible another shot, but this time I read it with an actual motivation to understand what was written, rather then just read passages that I was forced to back in middle school and high school.

    After going through certain books multiple times (Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and The New Testament, in particular) something began to hit me. Every time I read the passages over there was some sort of level of deeper understanding that I seemed to gleam from them, and it hasn’t stopped yet. I keep reading the same things over and over but they weigh more in my heart every single time if that makes sense.

    I believe that I’ve had a change of heart experience as my motivations in life are now different. I now do believe that I’ve been saved purely due to the grace and mercy of Jesus Christ, and that its my responsibility to live life as its written in order to celebrate this salvation. I started attending a Reformed Baptist church about 3 weeks ago, and they’ve mostly affirmed my beliefs including that the Bible is the inspired word of God and the only source of authority, no man made dogma should be followed. The people I’ve met so far seem to be cut from a different cloth then what I’m used to, and I hope to emulate how kind and compassionate they are.

    I’d like to sincerely thank you for the book suggestion, since it spurred me to have this conversion. You’ve done more for a young man over the internet then you can ever imagine.

    Hootin. I am glad to hear from you and overjoyed at your news. You have spent this last month most profitably.

    Keep on this walk. It is not always an easy road. The most important things in life happen when we can go no further on our own feet.

    I would recommend that you build good relationships with seasoned members, people you can confide in when it is rough. We all end up at that point and it is better to have allies before then. Beware the shallow smilers.

    What stood out for you in Ecclesiastes? It is one of my favorites but not a sunshiny book.

    I have not yet read The Holy War. It is on the list.

    I will be praying for you, brother. It is very good to hear from you again.



  • Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    It sounds like you’re at an important crossroads in life. This is a great one, short and easy to read. I look at it every two or three years.

    Cheers
    jammyjaybird



  • @jammyjaybird said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    Good recommendation.

    Ms. Wormwood in Calvin and Hobbes was named after one of the demons, so you know it’s quality.



  • @ransom

    Keep on this walk. It is not always an easy road. The most important things in life happen when we can go no further on our own feet.

    You’re telling me. With this different mindset I now have I keep catching myself doing things that just one month previously I would’ve thought as no big deal, but now weigh on my conscience. Staring at women a little too long, talking a bit too foolishly with my coworkers, telling white lies that shouldn’t be said; I’ve got alot of work to do.

    I would recommend that you build good relationships with seasoned members, people you can confide in when it is rough. We all end up at that point and it is better to have allies before then. Beware the shallow smilers.

    I’m already decent friends with a few members of my church, I’ve played basketball with the guys a couple of times and had lunch at one of their homes. I can already sort of tell who’s more ‘devout’ and who’s there for other reasons…whether its obligation, social interaction, who knows.

    What stood out for you in Ecclesiastes? It is one of my favorites but not a sunshiny book.

    You mean aside from the fact that Solomon just lays down the law that everything on earth is vain? I didn’t expect to read something so nihilistic in the Bible, though it made sense. What I enjoyed is that I’m used to hearing advice about being content with what you have from people who are poor or suffering, those who don’t really have much choice in the matter. To hear it from an ancient rich and powerful king was comforting and confirmed what I already suspected; that no amount of money or objects can fill that void I had before believing.

    The next thing I want to work on is doing good works, not because I believe they’ll save me, but because I believe its my duty. I’m going to see if there’s some volunteer groups I can join in the next coming weeks.

    Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    Sounds pretty interesting, I’ll check it out. Appreciate the recommendation.



  • @hootin

    You’re telling me. With this different mindset I now have I keep catching myself doing things that just one month previously I would’ve thought as no big deal, but now weigh on my conscience. Staring at women a little too long, talking a bit too foolishly with my coworkers, telling white lies that shouldn’t be said; I’ve got alot of work to do.

    I’m in the same boat and have been for many years (before that I didn’t care who I hurt). And…it’s a shifting baseline. By that I mean that once you have overcome a particular sin or shortcoming, you will discover new things you’re doing that you need to correct. As Romans 3:10 states “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one:” Life is like a never ending class with periodic quizzes and exams along the way. When we fail one, we have to do it over until we get it right. When we get it right we are presented with new challenges, new stumbling blocks to overcome.

    I can already sort of tell who’s more ‘devout’ and who’s there for other reasons…whether its obligation, social interaction, who knows.

    I experienced the same thing when I still attended organized church. We had folks who were there for the socializing. Others, to get on the business committee and run things. One guy went specifically to pick up women and point blank told me “There are more horny, frustrated women in church than anywhere else.” He was banging married a woman, everyone knew it and her husband was oblivious to it. Some folks go so they can sing and or play music. I found it to be more a social club than a Spiritual experience and the denomination didn’t seem to matter.

    In my mind, the important thing to remember is this: You can go to the building, fellowship with the congregation, listen to sermons, sing along with the choir and memorize every Bible verse. But if you don’t get the message; if you don’t fundamentally understand what God is trying to impart to us, it is all in vain.

    The next thing I want to work on is doing good works, not because I believe they’ll save me, but because I believe its my duty. I’m going to see if there’s some volunteer groups I can join in the next coming weeks.

    It’s not just your duty, it’s the best thing you can do for yourself and your family. When you bless other people you yourself will be blessed. We really do reap what we sow. That’s the key element that separates selfishness from self-interest. If you are genuinely self interested, then you will be interested in others, what benefits them and what you can do to help them. This goes back to loving your neighbor as you love yourself.


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