JIM JOHNSON I'M CALLING YOU OUT



  • Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    It sounds like you’re at an important crossroads in life. This is a great one, short and easy to read. I look at it every two or three years.

    Cheers
    jammyjaybird



  • @jammyjaybird said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    Good recommendation.

    Ms. Wormwood in Calvin and Hobbes was named after one of the demons, so you know it’s quality.



  • @ransom

    Keep on this walk. It is not always an easy road. The most important things in life happen when we can go no further on our own feet.

    You’re telling me. With this different mindset I now have I keep catching myself doing things that just one month previously I would’ve thought as no big deal, but now weigh on my conscience. Staring at women a little too long, talking a bit too foolishly with my coworkers, telling white lies that shouldn’t be said; I’ve got alot of work to do.

    I would recommend that you build good relationships with seasoned members, people you can confide in when it is rough. We all end up at that point and it is better to have allies before then. Beware the shallow smilers.

    I’m already decent friends with a few members of my church, I’ve played basketball with the guys a couple of times and had lunch at one of their homes. I can already sort of tell who’s more ‘devout’ and who’s there for other reasons…whether its obligation, social interaction, who knows.

    What stood out for you in Ecclesiastes? It is one of my favorites but not a sunshiny book.

    You mean aside from the fact that Solomon just lays down the law that everything on earth is vain? I didn’t expect to read something so nihilistic in the Bible, though it made sense. What I enjoyed is that I’m used to hearing advice about being content with what you have from people who are poor or suffering, those who don’t really have much choice in the matter. To hear it from an ancient rich and powerful king was comforting and confirmed what I already suspected; that no amount of money or objects can fill that void I had before believing.

    The next thing I want to work on is doing good works, not because I believe they’ll save me, but because I believe its my duty. I’m going to see if there’s some volunteer groups I can join in the next coming weeks.

    Since we’re recommending great Christian-themed moral books, here’s a must-read: The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis. It’s a series of letters from an elderly devil to a young devil instructing him on how best to corrupt humans. Superfamous title.

    Sounds pretty interesting, I’ll check it out. Appreciate the recommendation.



  • @hootin

    You’re telling me. With this different mindset I now have I keep catching myself doing things that just one month previously I would’ve thought as no big deal, but now weigh on my conscience. Staring at women a little too long, talking a bit too foolishly with my coworkers, telling white lies that shouldn’t be said; I’ve got alot of work to do.

    I’m in the same boat and have been for many years (before that I didn’t care who I hurt). And…it’s a shifting baseline. By that I mean that once you have overcome a particular sin or shortcoming, you will discover new things you’re doing that you need to correct. As Romans 3:10 states “As it is written, There is none righteous, no, not one:” Life is like a never ending class with periodic quizzes and exams along the way. When we fail one, we have to do it over until we get it right. When we get it right we are presented with new challenges, new stumbling blocks to overcome.

    I can already sort of tell who’s more ‘devout’ and who’s there for other reasons…whether its obligation, social interaction, who knows.

    I experienced the same thing when I still attended organized church. We had folks who were there for the socializing. Others, to get on the business committee and run things. One guy went specifically to pick up women and point blank told me “There are more horny, frustrated women in church than anywhere else.” He was banging married a woman, everyone knew it and her husband was oblivious to it. Some folks go so they can sing and or play music. I found it to be more a social club than a Spiritual experience and the denomination didn’t seem to matter.

    In my mind, the important thing to remember is this: You can go to the building, fellowship with the congregation, listen to sermons, sing along with the choir and memorize every Bible verse. But if you don’t get the message; if you don’t fundamentally understand what God is trying to impart to us, it is all in vain.

    The next thing I want to work on is doing good works, not because I believe they’ll save me, but because I believe its my duty. I’m going to see if there’s some volunteer groups I can join in the next coming weeks.

    It’s not just your duty, it’s the best thing you can do for yourself and your family. When you bless other people you yourself will be blessed. We really do reap what we sow. That’s the key element that separates selfishness from self-interest. If you are genuinely self interested, then you will be interested in others, what benefits them and what you can do to help them. This goes back to loving your neighbor as you love yourself.



  • @boothe

    While the main site seems to have been lost to almost all memes at this point, this forum topic keeps bringing me more and more wisdom. You fellas really don’t have any obligation to help this particular internet stranger and whoever else may be reading, and yet you still do. For that I thank you.



  • @hootin None of us have any obligation to each other, that much is true. But we’re all in this together and if I can offer some insight that helps you, that brings me joy. I just wish there was some way I could reach @jammyjaybird. I’ve tried every angle I know from finding common ground (and his recommendation to read the Screwtape Letters is sound advice) to hitting back at him in kind and as hard as I could. But to no avail… Perhaps “that other thread” isn’t for Jammy or me. It may get a bit of truth to someone that needs it. One never knows. So I continue to write. And yes, I saw the main site comments section deteriorating some time ago (right about the time the “vegetables” moved in) and decided to spend my time here at the forum instead. I can’t thank Cynic enough for providing this venue!



  • @hootin I’m glad you are embarking on this spiritual journey man. As Jesus says you will now be able to “ live life to the fullest” .( John 10:10). Please feel free to comment on the other religion topics. And your conversion has been an inspiration man may God bless you with the knowledge, heart, and motivation to keep it going



  • @ransom I remember that! I always joke that if I were made dictator of the world, the first thing I would do would be to force Bill Watterson to start drawing Calvin and Hobbes again.



  • @iattacku

    Appreciate the kind words, and from a frenchman no less. I’m honored.



  • @jammyjaybird said in JIM JOHNSON I’M CALLING YOU OUT:

    @ransom I remember that! I always joke that if I were made dictator of the world, the first thing I would do would be to force Bill Watterson to start drawing Calvin and Hobbes again.

    Pretty much!

    Calvin and Hobbes was pivotal to my childhood. Perhaps too pivotal. Definitely not a strip that could be made these days (he did fantasize about blowing up his school), but it captured a certain essence of boyhood that I haven’t seen anywhere else.

    Thank goodness for Calvin and Hobbes.



  • Sorry, I didn’t see this post until a year later. I haven’t been paying attention to this site. You sound like my parents. Good, honest people, very helpful in their community, etc. but not religious at all.

    I don’t know if you have to do much to truly believe in God. For me, it was mostly an issue of swallowing my pride and admitting that the beliefs I held up to that time may not be true. I had to be open to new ideas. As easy as that sounds, the act of changing your entire mindset happens very rarely with people.

    If you are curious about the LDS faith, I would suggest going to church, and just visiting with some of the local members. A big part of it for me was a friend of mine from elementary school who proved to be a good example. I had some things happen in my life that made me question if God was out there. The LDS faith seemed closest for me to what God intended his followers to be like. Most are honest, yet not so surrounded in ritual that they lose perspective of the world.



  • @hootin read above


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