Homeschooling & Other Alternatives



  • I am writing a series of articles on homeschooling and other alternatives to government school. This is a supplemental thread for people to ask questions and trade ideas.

    First question: who here homeschools or was homeschooled as a child? Who has any experience with other non-government education?



  • @ransom We homeschooled our youngest son for twelve years. I attended non-government private schools, except for a two week experiment with the local public school.



  • @boothe Two weeks, eh? Heh.

    I was “in the system” for the first few years, then started homeschooling until I enrolled at a community college.

    I take it your son did first-through-twelfth at home. What did he think of the experience in retrospect?



  • @ransom He realizes how much he learned that he would not have otherwise. He also learned, contrary to the collectivist hive-mind’s assertion to the contrary, how to socialize across all age groups. He had no problem, even as a teen, relating to the elderly, small children and adults. Probably the most important thing from an educational standpoint for him was that we taught him to be auto-didactic. When he reached twelfth grade, he wanted to learn calculus. Neither my wife nor I were capable of teaching it, but we were using Saxon Math curriculum so he was able to teach himself. He ran into a problem he couldn’t solve and finally determined that the book was wrong. So, he contacted the publisher with what he found and they confirmed they were in error. The next edition was corrected. To say I was very pleased with him would be an understatement. What is also telling is how much his wife has praised us for his upbringing. Overall, he seems to really appreciate it.



  • @boothe said in Homeschooling & Other Alternatives:

    @ransom He realizes how much he learned that he would not have otherwise. He also learned, contrary to the collectivist hive-mind’s assertion to the contrary, how to socialize across all age groups. He had no problem, even as a teen, relating to the elderly, small children and adults.

    Good. That seems to be a common concern among non-homeschoolers, but it doesn’t seem justified in my experience.

    As one person I’ve read said (approximately): “People ask, ‘but if they don’t go to school, how are they going to learn appropriate social skills?’ to which I respond, ‘you mean, like conformity and being bullied?’”

    Probably the most important thing from an educational standpoint for him was that we taught him to be auto-didactic. When he reached twelfth grade, he wanted to learn calculus. Neither my wife nor I were capable of teaching it, but we were using Saxon Math curriculum so he was able to teach himself. He ran into a problem he couldn’t solve and finally determined that the book was wrong. So, he contacted the publisher with what he found and they confirmed they were in error. The next edition was corrected. To say I was very pleased with him would be an understatement.

    Awesome! Good for him on all counts. Having the confidence and carry-through to address a publisher is valuable.

    Learning how to learn will pay off for a lifetime.

    What is also telling is how much his wife has praised us for his upbringing. Overall, he seems to really appreciate it.

    Good woman. If I may ask, what plans do they have for teaching their own children?



  • @ransom said in Homeschooling & Other Alternatives:

    Good woman. If I may ask, what plans do they have for teaching their own children?

    At this point they do not intend to have any children. Sadly, I doubt they ever will.



  • @ransom Good topic, we are getting ready to start a new year. This time we are homeschooling just the youngest three. It will be interesting to see how the girls adapt to the charter school, first time they are going to public school.

    BTW…I just about forgot about the AKC forum.



  • @boothe said in Homeschooling & Other Alternatives:

    At this point they do not intend to have any children. Sadly, I doubt they ever will.

    Itemize everything you spent on raising him, adjust for inflation, and offer him his choice of three repayment plans.

    @jim-johnson said in Homeschooling & Other Alternatives:

    @ransom Good topic, we are getting ready to start a new year. This time we are homeschooling just the youngest three. It will be interesting to see how the girls adapt to the charter school, first time they are going to public school.

    BTW…I just about forgot about the AKC forum.

    Managing six children in a homeschool environment does seem fraught with peril. When it works it works, when cereal is on the ceiling, not so much.

    @jim-johnson said in the post comments in response to my question about variations between charter schools:

    Yes they do, and they vary from state to state. There are basic requirements by the state, and the state pays for their education (at a lower rate than public schools). Because the school is private, it allows more leeway for them to do what they want. The school we are putting them in has a standard uniform, flag ceremonies in the morning, and more recess and PE than public schools. If there are local charter schools, I would recommend talking to parents (they are typically more involved with their kids, and are more conservative than public school families)

    That’s good to know, thank you. I imagine that charter schools are big enough to dilute some of the loopies that can dominate smaller, less formal organizations.

    School uniforms, huh. I think I would have found that embarrassing.



  • @ransom said in Homeschooling & Other Alternatives:

    Itemize everything you spent on raising him, adjust for inflation, and offer him his choice of three repayment plans.

    Haha! I get your point. But you do the best you can and understand, that just like us, your children have a free will…and they don’t come with a warranty.

    School uniforms, huh. I think I would have found that embarrassing.

    I had to wear a uniform in private school. It actually has a leveling effect. No one, no matter how much money their family has, comes in sporting high dollar clothes or two hundred dollar tennis shoes. It takes away a lot of stress and eliminates the possibility of people wearing controversial clothing. The girls had to be modest and no one came in with T-shirts on that could inflame political passions. Nor was I ever picked on for wearing “poor people” clothes (although my “peers” still found plenty to pick on me about). As a rugged individualist I’ve never cared much for any efforts to establish egalitarianism. But in the interests of maintaining order and preventing disruption in the educational environment, I can see the merit of uniforms in school.

    As a funny aside, our school uniforms consisted of a light blue dress shirt, a Navy blue tie, Navy blue slacks and black dress shoes. Honestly, I hated it. Then I joined the Air Force. Our “dress blues” were a light blue dress shirt, Navy tie and slacks, black shoes. Once I was discharged, I went to work in an industrial facility where the uniform was…get this…a light blue shirt and Navy blue slacks. I was starting to think I was under some type of curse, LoL. XD


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